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Should I Worry about Radon in Niagara?

Posted Mar 10th, 2020 in Healthy Home TIps, Sidebar Feed

Should I Worry about Radon in Niagara?

Radon in Niagara

In Niagara, most people know little of radon. It’s real, but no need to panic just yet.

 

With the close proximity to the Niagara escarpment, almost all homes test positive for low or normal levels of Radon.

This area is listed as HIGH on the relative Radon Hazard scale. The Niagara Falls region, for example, has indications of radon concentrations of 200-600 Bq/M3 in homes tested. That’s up to three times the reference level for Canada! 

Radon is a radioactive gas that comes from the breakdown of uranium in the soil and rock found in many areas of Ontario. It is invisible, odourless and tasteless. In enclosed spaces, like homes, it can accumulate to high levels and become a risk to the health of the occupants. Statistically 3000+ people per year die from radon-induced lung cancer.

Radon can enter a home any place it finds an opening where the house contacts the ground: cracks, construction joints, gaps around service pipes, windows, floor drains, sumps or cavities inside walls.



Oddly, radon can be found in one home in high quantities, and yet in low levels of concentration in an adjacent home.

By the same token, a home that tests negative one year for high concentration of radon can be found to have excessive amounts 12 months later.

Testing is the only way to be sure.

Consider professional, whole home air cleaners, air purifiers, duct cleaning & water filtration systems.

For more information on creating the best indoor air quality call Konkle in the Niagara area 905-563-4847 info@konkleplumbing.com

‡ – Source: Health Canada—Santé Canada and Radonfind.ca

The Radon Detection System recommended by Konkle Plumbing and Heating is available on this link. Radon Detector 


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